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- M -

Man, Guy:
    Bloke, Chap, Lad or Man 
(Max to Alan: 'What was the name of that bloke we met last night?')
(Note: 'Guy' is also being used more and more often by the Brits)

Mail:
    Post

Mail Box:
    Letter Box

'Main Street:'
    'High Street'

Masturbate, e.g. 'beat-off, jerk-off':
   'Wank,' Toss'
And a 'Wanker' & 'Tosser' is someone who supposedly 'beats-off' and is used as an semi-offensive term to call someone.  These are obvious slang terms and 'masturbate' is used when scientists talk about it...  The American slang terms are understood also.
("Hey Phil, ya know what? You're a Wanker!")

Math:
    Maths
('Hi mum, I've got loads of maths homework tonight')

My:
    My, Me
(As correctly as the English think they speak, they nearly all, at one time or another, use 'me' for 'my' when speaking casually.)
("Where's me coat Jane?")

(although it's supposedly only a 'northern' thing...)

Meatballs (a traditional style made with pork and pork liver):
    Faggots (!)  
(Sam to Linda:"What's for tea tonight Linda?" Linda to Sam: "Faggots, mash and peas dear")

[See picture]

Minister, Pastor, etc.:
    Vicar
(The English have their own protestant religion, the 'C of E,' or 'Church of England,' which is the predominant religion and a 'Vicar' is what they call  their earthly representative to God.
'Minority' religions do exist such as Methodists and they're called Ministers as normal.)

Mis-matched socks:
     Odd Socks
 ('Ian, you certainly look silly with those odd socks')

Mobile Home:
    Static Caravan, Caravan

Molasses:
    Treacle

Mom:
    Mum

Money:
    The Bits call their money (£) Pounds, or Pounds Sterling. Unlike ($) Dollars, their bills (notes) come in different sizes to differentiate value, e.g. a 'fiver' (five pound bill) is quite small compared to a fifty pound bill, which will barely fit in your wallet.
Their coins are in pence, or "p" and come in 1p, 2p (which are copper), 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p (silver color), the gold colored One Pound coin and the dual-color Two Pound coin which are both quite heavy.

Moron, Idiot:
    Berk, Pillock, Pratt, Plonker
('Your brother is a real pillock Michelle!')

Mother's Day:
    Mothering Sunday
(But Father's Day is called Father's Day)

Mouth:
    Mouth, 'Gob'
("Will you just shut your gob for 5 minutes Lisa!?")

Mouth Guard (boxing):
    Gum Shield

Movie:
    Film; movie also used

Movie Ratings ( PG, PG-13, R, X):
    "U" for universal, i.e. small kids upwards. And the rest: "PG," "12," "15," "18," & "Restricted 18" I think are self-explanatory.
(I got this straight from the British Board of Film Classifications so no more explanations in the guestbook about it!)

Movie Theater:
    Cinema

Muffler (car):
    Silencer

- N -

Nap:
    Kip, Nap
("I'm going for a bit of kip Janice, I'm knackered!")

Napkin:
    Serviette, Napkin

National Holiday:
    Bank Holiday

Natural Gas:
    Gas

Newstand:
   Newsagent

Nipple (for baby's bottle):
    Teat

Nothing (for zero quantity):
    Nil† 
("The score of the football game was 'two - nil'' ")

- O -

Odometer:
    Mileometer

Off-Ramp, On-Ramp (highway):
    Slip Road

One-Storey House:
    Bungalow

One time, Single Time, Unique:
    'One-Off'
(For example: The Brits love their documentaries. If they are starting a new documentary that will be shown over many weeks it is of course a 'series,'  but if it is just a single episode documentary, they'll call it a 'one-off' documentary.)

One-Way Ticket:
    Single Ticket

Operating Room:
    Operating Theatre

Outsource (labor):
   Sub-Contract

Oven, Stove:
    Cooker, Oven

Oventop, Stovetop:
    Hob

Overpass:
    Flyover

Overseas:
    Abroad 
("James is going to live abroad for a year")

- P -

Pacifier:
    Dummy

Panties:
    Knickers (!)

Pants, Trousers or Slacks:
    Trousers (only)

Pantyhose:
    Tights

Paper Towels:
    Kitchen Roll

Parking Brake:
    Hand Brake

Parking Lot:
    Car Park

Pass (to pass another car):
    Overtake

Pavement, Asphalt:
    Tarmac

Paycheck:
    Pay Packet

Pedal Bike, Bicycle:
    Push Bike, Bicycle

Pedestrian Crossing, Crosswalk(without lights):
    Zebra Crossing (!!)

Pedestrian Crossing, Crosswalk (with lights):
    Pelican Crossing (!)

Pee:
    Wee
("I'll be back in a sec, I've got to go for a wee")

Penis:
    Willy, Todger and all of the 'normal' crude words
('Willy' is what young children are taught to call it)

Period (punctuation):
    Full Stop

Person on Vacation:
    Holidaymaker

Pet (pet the dog):
    Stroke (!)  
('Ian, can I stroke your dog?')

Pharmacist, Druggist:
    Chemist, pharmacy (sometimes)

Phone Booth:
    Phone-Box, Call-Box

Photos Sizes: 8x10, 5x7, 4x6, etc.:
    10x8, 7x5, 6x4
(The Brits say their photo sizes backwards..)

Physical Therapist:
    Physiotherapist, 'physio'

Pickle:
    Gherkin

Pint (U.S. 16oz.):
    Pint (UK 20oz.)

P.M.S:
    P.M.T†(pre-menstrual tension)

Police:
    Police, 'the Bill,' 'the old Bill'

Police Line-Up:
    Identity parade (!)

Police Officer:
    P.C.† (Police Constable), 'Bobby on the beat'

Popsicle:
    Iced Lolly

Potato Chips:
    Crisps

Pre-Natal:
    Ante-Natal

President (of the United States):
    We won't even go there!, i.e. 'no comment.'
The brits don't like to be compared in any way to the American system!

Pretentious (talker), 'smoothtalker,' etc.:
    'Blag','Blagueur'
('Boy did Ben ever blag his way into that job!')

Preview, Trailer (movie):
    Trailer (only)

Prison, Penitentiary, Slammer:
    The Nick, Prison

Private Parts, Genitals:
    'Rude Bits,' Genitals

Private School:
    Public School (!!)

'The Projects':
    'Estates.'  
('Estate' is a confusing word in Britain. When speaking of inner-city 'estates' they're referring to the equivalent to 'The Projects.'  But it also means a new sub-division of 'normal' houses. And if you mention a 'country estate,' it could be the 400-acre grand, private 'estate' of Lord Wadsworth or some other person with 'blue blood.')    

Pudding:
    Blancmange (pronounced: 'blahmanj')
(The Brits use the word 'pudding' as one of  their terms to mean 'dessert.')

Purse:
   Handbag

Push-Up:
†    Press-Up† 
('Give me twenty press-ups recruit')

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